fplll 5.1 and fpylll 0.2.4dev

New versions of fplll and fpylll were released today. I’ve reproduced release notes below for greater visibility. The biggest user-visible changes for fplll are probably that

  • CVP enumeration is not experimental any more,
  • support for external enumeration libraries (go write that GPU implementation of enumeration) was added and
  • support for OSX was greatly improved.

On the fpylll side, the biggest user-visible changes are probably various API updates and a much nicer strategy/framework for gathering statistics about BKZ.

The next version of fplll will contain support for LLL reduction on Gram matrices.

Continue reading “fplll 5.1 and fpylll 0.2.4dev”

fpylll

fpylll is a Python library for performing lattice reduction on lattices over the Integers. It is based on the fplll, a C++ library which describes itself as follows:

fplll contains several algorithms on lattices that rely on floating-point computations. This includes implementations of the floating-point LLL reduction algorithm, offering different speed/guarantees ratios. It contains a ‘wrapper’ choosing the estimated best sequence of variants in order to provide a guaranteed output as fast as possible. In the case of the wrapper, the succession of variants is oblivious to the user. It also includes a rigorous floating-point implementation of the Kannan-Fincke-Pohst algorithm that finds a shortest non-zero lattice vector, and the BKZ reduction algorithm.

fplll is distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (either version 2.1 of the License, or, at your option, any later version) as published by the Free Software Foundation.

In short, fplll is your best bet at a publicly available fast lattice-reduction library and fpylll provides a convenient interface for it — for experimentation, development and extension — from Python.

For the rest of this post, I’ll give you a tour of the features currently implemented in fpylll and point out some areas where we could do with some help.

Continue reading “fpylll”

fplll days 1

We’ll have a first fplll coding sprint aka “fplll days” from June 20 to June 24 at ENS Lyon.

The idea of fplll days is inspired by and might follow the format of Sage Days which are semi-regularly organised by the SageMath community. The idea is simply to get a bunch of motivated developers in a room to work on code. Judging from experience in the SageMath community, lots of interesting projects get started and completed.

We intend to combine the coding sprint with the lattice meeting (to be confirmed), so we’d be looking at 3 days of coding plus 2 days of regular lattice meeting. We might organise one talk per coding day, to give people a reason to gather at a given time of the day, but the focus would be very much on working on fplll together.

If you’d like to attend, please send an e-mail to one of the maintainers e.g. me.

Google Summer of Code 2015

Both Sage and the Lmonade project were selected for Google’s Summer of Code 2015. If you are an eligible student, you should consider applying. If you need ideas what to work on, there are many fine projects/project ideas on either the Lmonade or the Sage GSoC pages. In particular, here are the fplll project ideas, for which I could be one of the two mentors.

Continue reading “Google Summer of Code 2015”

Looking Back and Forward for Open-Source Mathematics Software (2014)

When a year ends people make lists. I can only guess that several people are currently busy with writing “The 5 most revised papers on eprint ” and “The 8 best IACR flagship conference rump session presentations of 2014”. Since all the good lists are taken, my list has to be a little bit more personal. Alas, here is my list of stuff that happened in open-source computational mathematics in 2014 around me. That is, below I list what developments happened in 2014 and try to provide an outlook for 2015 (so that I can come back in a year to notice that nothing played out as planned).

If you are interested in any of the projects below feel invited to get involved. Also, if you are student and you are interested in working on one of the (bigger) projects listed below over the summer, get in touch: we could try to turn it into a Google Summer of Code 2015 project.

Continue reading “Looking Back and Forward for Open-Source Mathematics Software (2014)”