Efficient Linear Algebra for Gröbner Basis Computations – June 4-8, 2012 – Kaiserslautern, Germany

Linear algebra plays an important role in modern efficient implementations of Gröbner basis algorithms. Consequently, a number of groups aim at developing linear algebra packages for these computations: we mention the HPAC project, LELA by the Singular team, the FGB package by Jean-Charles Faugère, the M4RI libraries, specialised linear algebra routines in PolyBoRi as well as non-public projects. In this workshop we want to bring researchers interested in this problem and developers of these packages together to discuss and develop solutions. The format of this workshop will be a mixture of talks, coding sprints and design discussions.

Topics will include but are not limited to:

  • presentation of existing software packages and solutions for linear algebra suitable for Gröbner basis computations
  • presentation of scientific results on linear algebra for Gröbner basis computations
  • modular approaches to Gröbner basis computations which allow to swap linear algebra packages
  • approaches to parallelization of linear algebra routines on multicore machines, multiple machines and GPUs.
  • suitable benchmark and test matrices, ideals and their format.

Invited Speakers

  • Brice Boyer (Grenoble, France)
  • Michael Brickenstein (Oberwolfach, Germany)
  • Daniel Cabarcas (Darmstadt, Germany)
  • Jean-Charles Faugère (Paris, France)
  • Bradford Hovinen (Munich, Germany)
  • Sylvain Lachartre (Paris, France)
  • Emmanuel Thomé (Nancy, France)

The workshop will feature mathematical talks, presentations on software and coding sprints.

Registration

There is no registration fee for the workshop. Please email the organizers beforehand if you intend to participate.

It is strongly recommended that participants bring their own laptop for use during the coding sprints.

More information regarding this event is available at http://wiki.lmona.de/events/elagb

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Call for Papers: 3nd International Conference on Symbolic Computation and Cryptography

CIEM – Castro Urdiales, Spain, 11-13 July 2012, http://scc2012.unican.es/

CALL FOR PAPERS

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Deadline for submission: April 28, 2012
  • Notification of acceptance or rejection: May 18, 2012
  • Deadline for final version: May 30, 2012
  • Deadline for registration: June 12, 2012
  • Deadline for special issue JSC: September 30, 2012

SCC 2012 is the third edition of a new series of conferences where  research and development in symbolic computation and cryptography may be presented and discussed. It is organized in response to the growing  interest in applying and developing methods, techniques, and software  tools of symbolic computation for cryptography. The use of Lattice  Reduction algorithms in cryptology and the application of Groebner  bases in the context of algebraic attacks are typical examples of  explored applications. The SCC 2012 conference is co-located with  third Workshop on Mathematical Cryptology (WMC 2012, http://wmc2012.unican.es/) , an event also organized by research group Algorithmic Mathematics  And Cryptography (AMAC), which will be held on 9-11 July 2012.

Continue reading “Call for Papers: 3nd International Conference on Symbolic Computation and Cryptography”

Summer School on Tools :: Mykonos, Greece :: 28.5 – 1.6.

Slightly redacted announcement for the 2012 Summer School on Tools below.

Following the success of the ECRYPT Workshop on Tools for Cryptanalysis 2010,the ECRYPT II Symmetric Techniques Virtual Lab (SymLab) is pleased to announce the 2012 Summer School on Tools. Covering selected topics in both symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, this summer school will provide a thorough overview of some of the most important cryptographic tools that emerged in recent years. While the summer school is aimed primarily at postgraduate students, attendance is open to all. Continue reading “Summer School on Tools :: Mykonos, Greece :: 28.5 – 1.6.”

Sage/FLINT Days aka Sage Days 35

I am writing this while waiting for my taxi to leave Sage Days 35. Although, I didn’t get much actual coding done, it was great fun and very useful. I met a lot of old friend, new faces and managed to put faces to e-mail addresses.

In terms of coding projects, first, I tried to speed up linear algebra mod p where p is a 32 or 64 bit prime. But it turns out that any trick I could think of could not improve on Frederik’s code. So that didn’t lead anywhere but I allowed me to read some code of FLINT2 (very readable) and admire how carefully it is written.

My other two projects both involved evaluate–pointwise-multiply–interpolate algorithms for fast matrix-matrix products over finite extension fields or for matrices with polynomial coefficients (over prime fields).  After my talk on M4RI(E) David Harvey worked out how to improve multiplication over \mathbb{F}_{2^6} from 17 multiplications over \mathbb{F}_2 to 15, which then lead to a general approach for \mathbb{F}_{2^m} with composite m. Much of it remains to be implemented (efficiently), but the \mathbb{F}_{2^6} example indeed shows a 10% speed-up as expected. The code is not clean yet, uses way too much memory and doesn’t deal with the more advanced finite field stuff appropriately. It should end up in M4RIE eventually though.

I also contributed a bit to #12177 which is about a “prime slice” implementation of matrices over \mathbb{F}_{p^k}. The idea is essentially to represent  these matrices as polynomials with matrix coefficients and to use fast polynomial multiplication algorithms for these polynomials. It turns out, this works very well even for small finite fields. Burcin Eröcal did all the coding, I only helped with some discussions. We need to polish the code a lot to be usable, so if you like matrices over \mathbb{F}_{p^k} head over to #12177 and help out.

Sage/FLINT Days in Warwick 17 – 22nd December 2011

“A Sage Days workshop around the theme of Algorithms in Number Theory and FLINT.”

 

 

See http://wiki.sagemath.org/SageFlintDays for more information and registration.

PS: I’ll be talking about M4RI(E) … big surprise.